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Christmas in Columbia County is happening now through January 1, 2019 at Evans Towne Center Park. For more information in regards to specific event updates, please visit Columbia County Community Events Facebook Page.
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Waste Removal

The neighborhood you’re moving to may already have a specific waste removal vendor, so we’d recommend inquiring with your Homeowners Association. However, if you need to find a specific waste removal option, a few local options are listed below*:

Advance Disposal
http://www.advanceddisposal.com/
(706) 790-7920

Augusta Disposal & Recycling
http://augustadisposal.com/
(706) 860-2208

The Waste Solutions
http://thewastesolutions.com/
(706) 833-8684

 

*Please note this is not a complete list. If you'd like to be added to this list, please contact us.

Columbia County Recycling Centers

William Few Facility
(706) 868-3352

1960 Willian Few Parkway
Grovetown, Georgia 30813

Riverside Facility
(706) 868-3352

3 Dolphin Way
Evans, Georgia 30809

Hours of Operation

*Closed on County Observed Holidays

  • Sunday: Closed
  • Monday:Closed
  • Tuesday: 8:30AM - 5:30PM
  • Wednesday: 8:30AM - 5:30PM
  • Thursday: 8:30AM - 5:30PM
  • Friday: 8:30AM - 5:30PM
  • Saturday: 7:00AM - 4:00PM

Recyclable Items

Electronic and Computer Equipment

Hard drives removed and destroyed on site free of charge!

Anything with a cord is accepted including cell phones, computers, CRT monitors*, electronic game consoles, fax machines, laptops, LCD monitors, office equipment, printers, scanners, phones, rechargeable batteries, routers, servers, and TV’s* (*Denotes a fee is charged.)

Plastics

water bottle recycling diagramTypes 1 and 2 are the most commonly used plastics and are the easiest to recycle. Some of types 3, 5 and 7 are recyclable but most are not. The recycling symbol is used to indicate that they are recyclable if the market is available. Currently, Columbia County only accepts types 1 and 2 because our processors do not collect higher numbers at this time.

What is the difference in the types of plastics?

The following chart indicates the most popular types of plastics and some common uses.

#1 & #2 Plastics: Drinking bottles, clean food containers and bottles with no residue, personal hygiene bottles and containers and non-corrosive cleaning bottles and containers.

The following items are only accepted if they are free of all residue: condiment bottles, produce, cake and salad containers.

Symbol
Material
recycle 1 symbol Polyethylene Terephthalate Ethylene
PETE goes into soft drink, juice, water, detergent, and cleaner bottles. Also used for cooking and peanut butter jars
recycle 2 symbol High Density Polyethylene
High Density Polyethylene HDPE goes into milk and water jugs, bleach bottles, detergent and shampoo. Plastic bags and grocery sacks, motor oil bottles, household cleaners and butter tubs.
recycle 3 symbol Polyvinyl Chloride
PVC goes into window cleaner, cooking oils, and detergent bottles. Also used for peanut butter jars and water jugs.
recycle 4 symbol Low Density Polyethylene
LDPE goes into plastic bags and grocery sacks, dry cleaning bags and flexible film packaging. Also some bottles.
recycle 5 symbol Polypropylene
PP goes into caps, disks, syrup bottles, yogurt tubs, straws and film packaging.
recycle 6 symbol
Polystyrene
PS goes into meat trays, egg cartons, plates, cutlery, carry-out containers and clear trays.

Paper and Cardboard

Paper shredding is available. Fees apply (see fee schedule).  

Computer, notebook and office paper, books, junk mail, magazines, newspaper, uncoated food and snack boxes (white inside), packing paper, phone books and shredded paper.

On-site paper shredding is now available at the Riverside (Evans) facility. Paper may be dropped off at the William Few facility in our secure bins that are picked up daily. There is no limit. *A fee is charged.

Brown unwaxed and uncoated boxes (grease and contamination free), food boxes, loose corrugated cardboard, moving boxes, shipping boxes, shoe boxes, soda and other drink packaging. NO PIZZA DELIVERY BOXES!

Metal and Aluminum

Aluminum drink cans, rinsed food cans (labels may be left on) and scrap metal. Aluminum foil and aluminum baking pans are accepted only if they are residue free.

Appliances and Tires

Anything with a cord is accepted, including: air conditioners**, dishwashers**, dryers**, freezers**, microwaves**, ovens**, refrigerators**, rechargeable batteries, stoves**, washing machines** and water heaters**.

**Denotes a fee is charged. See Fees

Tires: passenger, large vehicle, agricultural, motorcycle and ATV. A fee is charged for all tires.

Ink Cartridges

Name brand cartridges only.

 

Paint, Gasoline and Chemical Disposal

If you were a business generating this sort of waste, you would be required to track generation and disposal, and pay very high disposal costs to have the material safely removed and either recycled (most likely blended into fuels for industrial furnaces and boilers) or disposed in a hazardous waste landfill. However, state and federal laws provide an exemption for residents; you can legally throw this material in the garbage. However, the material must be a solid; garbage trucks are not allowed to pick up liquid waste.

For those interested in pursuing a more environmentally friendly remedy, MKC of Doraville Ga. (770-457-1341) is one of the few companies that will accept small amounts of Household Hazardous Waste from individuals, for a small fee.

The processes described here basically involve either solidifying wastes for disposal via regular garbage service, or evaporation. With both of the basic below steps, you want to work outside, and wear rubber gloves and eye protection. Never mix more than one material as you’re preparing the items for disposal.

Donate: Before you dispose of a full can of paint, think of those less fortunate.  The Habitat for Humanity Restore located at 1004 Walton Way Augusta, GA  30909 will accept cans of paint.  Call (706) 364-7637 for hours of operation and donation specifics.

Solidification: The idea here is to make the liquids solid. Sawdust or shredded newspaper will work, but for any real quantity you’ll want to get some kitty litter, cheaper at auto parts stores; ask for oil dry. Double-line a garbage can with plastic garbage bags, add some oil dry and then some liquid waste. Work outside, away from access by children or animals. When the material is solidified, tie up the bag and it can then go into the regular trash. Be sure not to get the bag so heavy that you can’t handle it, or that it ruptures.

Evaporation: Work outside, away from access by children and animals. If there is just a trace amount of fuel in the container, simply open the top and let it evaporate. If you have more than a very little bit, you'll want to accelerate the process. Get some sort of disposable metal tray (an aluminum foil roasting pan is ideal) and pour a half-inch of fuel into the tray. The increased surface area will allow the fuel to evaporate much more quickly. Repeat this process until the fuel is gone, and then recycle or reuse the containers if possible.

The foil tray can be recycled with scrap aluminum; if you're leery of having the fuel-coated foil around your house until you can recycle it then wad up the tray, wrap it in a few layers of newspaper and put it in a sturdy plastic garbage bag. Then it can be disposed of in your regular household trash.

To properly dispose of household chemicals, leftover paint that is unusable, automotive chemicals, etc. contact Environmental Alternatives at 706-737-8433.  Fees apply. 

Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

What should I do with a CFL when it burns out? EPA recommends that consumers take advantage of available local recycling options for compact fluorescent light bulbs. EPA is working with CFL manufacturers and major U.S. retailers to expand recycling and disposal options. Consumers can contact their local municipal solid waste agency directly, or go to www.epa.gov/bulbrecycling or www.earth911.org to identify local recycling options.

If your state or local environmental regulatory agency permits you to put used or broken CFLs in the garbage, seal the bulb in two plastic bags and put it into the outside trash, or other protected outside location, for the next normal trash collection. Never send a fluorescent light bulb or any other mercury-containing product to an incinerator.

If your ENERGY STAR qualified CFL product burns out before it should, look at the CFL base to find the manufacturer’s name. Visit the manufacturer’s web site to find the customer service contact information to inquire about a refund or replacement. Manufacturers producing ENERGY STAR qualified CFLs are required to offer at least a two-year limited warranty (covering manufacturer defects) for CFLs used at home. In the future, save your receipts to document the date of purchase.

How should I clean up a broken fluorescent bulb?  Because CFLs contain a small amount of mercury, EPA recommends the following clean-up and disposal guidelines:

Before Clean Up: Air Out the Room
Have people and pets leave the room, and don't let anyone walk through the breakage area on their way out.

Open a window and leave the room for 15 minutes or more.

Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning system, if you have one.

Clean Up for Hard Surfaces
Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.

Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass pieces and powder.

Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes. Place towels in the glass jar or plastic bag.

 Do not use a vacuum or broom to clean up the broken bulb on hard surfaces.

Clean Up for Carpeting or Rugs
Carefully pick up glass fragments and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.

Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.

If vacuuming is needed after all visible materials are removed, vacuum the area where the bulb was broken.

Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister), and put the bag or vacuum debris in a sealed plastic bag.

Disposal of Clean Up Materials
Immediately place all clean-up materials outdoors in a trash container or protected area for the next normal trash pickup.

Wash your hands after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing clean-up materials.

Check with your local or state government about disposal requirements in your specific area. Some states do not allow such trash disposal. Instead, they require that broken and unbroken mercury-containing bulbs be taken to a local recycling center.

 


Recycling Fees

Item Fee
Air Conditioners $10.00 each
CRT Monitors $5.00 each
Dishwashers $5.00 each
Dryers $5.00 each
Freezers $10.00 each
Microwaves $5.00 each
Ovens $5.00 each
Refrigerators $10.00 each
Stoves $5.00 each
Televisions $0.30 per pound
Tires-Passenger $5.00 each
Tires-Large/Ag $10.00 each
Washing Machines $5.00 each
Water Heaters $5.00 each

Paper Shredding Fees

Paper by Weight Fee
1-10 pounds $2.00
11 pounds and up $0.20 per pound

(All fees subject to change with Board of Commissioners approval.)